Starting Conversations: Community Archiving

"Designing the Archive" is the second installment in our Starting Conversations series on Community Archiving. Facilitator Shane Flores discusses the design process with two New Mexico Highlands University students who helped to design the Manitos Community Memory Project digital archives. Lilly Padilla and Natasha Vasquez also share their experiences with investigating their personal family and community histories and identities through this project.

Conceptual artist and interdisciplinary culture worker, Shane Flores is Community Facilitator for the Manitos Community Memory Project and is the principal at studio wetFuture, developing history and culture based content for cultural institutions, including The Bradbury Science Museum, The City of Las Vegas Museum, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs and UNM Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. He holds a BFA in Media Arts from New Mexico Highlands University in Las Vegas, New Mexico.

Lily Padilla is a New Mexico Highlands University graduate with a BFA in media arts with an emphasis in visual communications. She is currently working with an internship through the Media Arts and Technology department for the Manitos Community Memory Project. She works with graphic design, illustration and project management for Manitos. Lily is excited to contribute to the archive as part of connecting to her community.

Natasha Vasquez graduated from New Mexico Highlands University with a degree in media arts with an emphasis in multimedia and interactivity. She is currently doing an internship through Highlands working with the Manitos Community Memory Project. She feels incredibly grateful to be working on projects that are committed to archiving her community and culture. She mostly works on illustrations, animations, and some design.

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Starting Conversations: Community Archiving

"The Living Archive" is the third installment of our Starting Conversations series on Community Archiving. In this session, facilitator Shane Flores is diving into questions about community archiving and community engagement. His guests Katy Gross and Isabel Trujillo draw conclusions around what it means to incorporate personal histories and identities into an archive.

Conceptual artist and interdisciplinary culture worker, Shane Flores is Community Facilitator for the Manitos Community Memory Project and is the principal at studio wetFuture, developing history and culture based content for cultural institutions, including The Bradbury Science Museum, The City of Las Vegas Museum, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs and UNM Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. He holds a BFA in Media Arts from New Mexico Highlands University in Las Vegas, New Mexico.

Katy Gross is Deputy Director and Education Director at Littleglobe. She is a photographer, educator, multimedia producer, and mother. Born and raised in Santa Fe, NM, she fell in love with photography as a teenager when she took a black and white darkroom class at the local teen arts center, Warehouse 21. She holds an MA in arts education from NYU and a BA from Brown University in International Development Studies. She studied documentary photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, ME and at the former College of Santa Fe. She has traveled to Ghana volunteering for an non-governmental organization that promotes women entrepreneurs and traveled to the South Pacific to accompany a film crew following six Navajo Code Talkers revisiting WWII battlefields. She has been leading multimedia storytelling and production workshops with youth and community members since 2011. She developed the Culture Connects Toolkit, which is a set of practices and tools for implementing storytelling and engagement workshops in various community settings, and feels passionately about utilizing art and story work to respond to community needs in a variety of ways.

Isabel War Trujillo has been the grantwriter and Director for El Pueblo de Abiquiu Library & Cultural Center for around 20 years.  Her inter-generational projects have resulted in special collections that serve to give audio and visual presentations for others around the world to understand about the Genizaro people of Abiquiu.  She has brought many people together for discussions and included youth to participate in order for them to gain pride in awareness for new creative career paths that allow them to remain in the area and continue these stories of historical facts that can help to guide their future with experience and awareness.

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Starting Conversations: Community Archiving

Our newest Starting Conversations series takes up the subject of Community Archiving. This series explores the methods and effects of public and communal archiving practices, especially in the context of the Manitos Community Memory Project, which is a community-built digital archive. Shane Flores facilitates this series with archivists, scholars, and students who have participated in the Manitos Project. "Archiving the Diaspora" is the first installment in this series and we're talking to Dr. Eric Romero and Dr. Trisha Martinez who are two academic scholars working toward building a more representative archive.

 

Conceptual artist and interdisciplinary culture worker, Shane Flores is Community Facilitator for the Manitos Community Memory Project and is the principal at studio wetFuture, developing history and culture based content for cultural institutions, including The Bradbury Science Museum, The City of Las Vegas Museum, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs and UNM Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. He holds a BFA in Media Arts from New Mexico Highlands University in Las Vegas, New Mexico.

Dr. Trisha Martinez, heir to the Arroyo Hondo Arriba Land Grant, is a  PhD graduate in American Studies from the University of New Mexico. Her dissertation, entitled Living the Manito Trail: Maintaining Self, Culture, and Community, is an interdisciplinary ethnographic study that relied heavily on oral histories she collected from Manito communities who migrated from northern New Mexico to Wyoming. Currently, Trisha is a post-doctoral fellow at UNM-Taos, teaching Chicana and Chicano Studies, serving as the program coordinator and working with northern New Mexico high school students and the dual credit program. She is also serving as a Visiting Assistant Professor for the University of Wyoming’s- School of Culture, Gender, and Social Justice-Latina/o Studies Program. Through teaching and community outreach, she is excited to help inspire the youth and create opportunities that serve in the best interest of our community.

Dr. Eric Romero Interim Chair: Department of Languages and Culture at NM Highlands University; the Vice-Chair Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Advisory Council; Senior Associate: Center for the Study and Education of Diverse Populations (CESDP); and the Interim Director: Center for the Study of Northern New Mexico and the Greater Southwest. His research interests include Chicano ethnic identity formation, southwestern sociolinguistics, heritage language revitalization, Hispanic land grant and acequia communities, immigration, U.S./Mexico Relations and Border, Becas Para Aztlán program history, place-making and rural land use behaviors, Native American and Mestizaje traditions. 

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In Case You Missed It. . . Live! Starting Conversations: The Manhattan Project

This session was the final part in our Starting Conversations series "History, Memory and Public Space," which investigated how historical narratives are shaped within communities of diverse perspectives. Facilitator Raffi Andonian specifically examined how public sites and community memory play a key role in history as a subject. The series culminated in this live panel discussion and Q&A using Los Alamos as a case study. The creation of the atomic bomb changed the course of world events, and there are many differing views on what we can learn from the consequences---good and bad---of it. Each scholar on this panel discussion came with their own unique personal ties to the Manhattan Project, and examined the historical legacy of such a globally impactful endeavor from their lived experiences.

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Starting Conversations with Megan Kamerick: Citizen Journalism

This is the fourth installment of our series on Media and Democracy led by Megan Kamerick on the topic of small newsrooms and startup news publications. The focus of this discussion is hyperlocal news outlets that are actively responding to the needs of their communities. By providing coverage of the stories that matter most to the local communities, these outlets are cutting through the glut of information presented by mass media. Kamerick is joined by Heather Bryant, Lou McCall, Peter Rice, and Larry Ryckman.

The Tiny News Collective

Questa del Rio News

Downtown Albuquerque News

The Colorado Sun

Nieman Lab: Build for a Crisis: Ideas for the future of local news

Hussman School of Journalism and Media: The loss of local news and what it means for communities

Local Journalism Sustainability Act seeking Congressional support to keep newspapers viable

National Trust For Local News

NPR: In Denver, Civic-Minded 'Colorado Sun' Acquires Suburban Newspaper Chain

Politico: Why Has Local News Collapsed? Blame Readers.

Megan Kamerick is an award-winning journalist and radio producer based in Albuquerque, NM. She is the newly named News Director of KUNM. She is the former host of "All Things Considered" on KUNM-FM in Albuquerque. She is a former TED Speaker and current TED Speaker Coach.

Heather Bryant is the interim Executive Director of the Tiny News Collective, an initiative supporting founders launching local news organizations across the country. 

Lou McCall is founding Editor of the Questa del Rio News in Questa, NM, serving the communities of northern Taos County. She is from Farmington, NM and studied Art, Architecture, and Education. She has produced, edited, and written for several publications throughout New Mexico and writes poetry and non-fiction. She lives in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains with her partner and pets, where she enjoys hiking and gardening, teaches yoga and meditation, and is committed to helping create a better world. 

Peter Rice is the Founder and Editor of Downtown Albuquerque News, a subscription e-newsletter covering Downtown and surrounding neighborhoods. He has previously worked at KUNM, the Albuquerque Tribune, as well as papers and public radio stations in Washington, Oregon, and Colorado. 

Larry Ryckman is Editor and Co-founder of The Colorado Sun. Previously he was Senior Editor at The Denver Post, Managing Editor at The Gazette in Colorado Springs, and City Editor at the Greeley Tribune. Ryckman spent 22 years at The Associated Press, where he was Assistant Managing Editor, a National Editor, and Supervisor of the AP's national desk in New York. He spent nearly four years as a Moscow correspondent for AP and helped cover the fall of the Soviet Union and the rise of a new Russia. He also supervised AP's coverage of the Columbine High School massacre and directed AP's coverage of the presidential election recount in Florida in 2000. 

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Starting Conversations: History, Memory, and Public Space: Historic Sites

For the third session in our series on History, Memory and Public Space, we invite our viewers to consider how place figures in methods of historical inquiry. Raffi and his guests discuss public and historic sites where major historical events occurred and why their preservation is valuable for the understanding of history. With a Civil War scholar and a renowned Los Alamos physicist, this session explores the ways in which a physical place provides context and community perspectives that help us deepen our relationship to history, all so that we might learn even more from it. 

 History, Memory and Public Space is a series that addresses how differing historical perspectives shape our present and future.

This series is facilitated by Raffi E. Andonian who is a best-selling author of 3 books. He has previously worked guiding visitors at the Gettysburg battlefield, the Civil War sites around Richmond, the Martin Luther King birth home in Atlanta, and the history museum in Los Alamos NM. He has a master’s degree in history and another master’s degree in historic preservation.

Dr. Dennis J. (Denny) Erickson is a physicist retired from the Los Alamos National Laboratory in Northern New Mexico. His Lab roles included those of scientific leader, senior-level manager, and institutional executive with accomplishments spanning basic and applied science, large mission-based R&D programs, hazardous operations, and protective programs for safety, health, and environment. Denny, born and raised in Minnesota, holds an undergraduate degree in Physics and Mathematics from Augsburg University in Minneapolis and a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. In his years of retirement, he has pursued public service initiatives with concentrations on Los Alamos history, community-based economic revitalization, and higher education. He is a past president and board member of the Los Alamos Historical Society, served as a citizen advisor to Los Alamos County, and, acting on a lifetime commitment to liberal arts as an academic foundation, recently completed service as a proactive member of the California Lutheran University Board of Regents. Among his recognitions, Denny Erickson was named a 2019 Living Treasure of Los Alamos for his long-running leadership and collaboration in strategy-driven projects that promote the wellbeing of people and community.

Dr. Jennifer Murray is a military historian, with a specialization in the American Civil War, in the Department of History at Oklahoma State University. Murray is the author of On A Great Battlefield: The Making, Management, and Memory of Gettysburg National Military Park, 1933-2013, published by the University of Tennessee Press in 2014. She is currently working on a full-length biography of George Gordon Meade, tentatively titled Meade at War. Murray is a veteran faculty member at Gettysburg College’s Civil War Institute and a coveted speaker at Civil War symposiums and roundtables. In addition, Murray worked as a seasonal interpretive park ranger at Gettysburg National Military Park for nine summers (2002-2010).

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Starting Conversations: Acequia Aqui Technology and Craft 

Technology and Craft is the third part of our Starting Conversations: Acequia Aqui series. As part of our partnership with The Paseo Project (Taos, NM), this program is celebrating Paseo Project’s recent publication: "Acequia Aqui: Water, Community and Creativity." This booklet highlights selections from the Acequia Aqui project that took place between 2018 and 2020. It’s an artistic and community driven project that aims to give voice to the historic acequias of Taos to illuminate the importance of this vital resource and cultural wellspring. You can view a digital version of this booklet on ISSU.

Our guests, Morgan Barnard and Juanita Lavadie have come together to talk about how their work addresses acequia culture and engagement through new media technology and craft traditions.

Morgan Barnard is a digital artist and designer working in the areas of public art, interactive media, immersive installations and live cinema. His studio, located in the high desert of New Mexico is focused on creating work that combines interactivity, data-visualisation, real-time systems and experimental digital techniques to create unique experiences for audiences.

Juanita Lavadie is an educator, artist, acequiera and historian. A retired public school teacher, oral historian, and graphic and fiber artist, Lavadie’s creative and cultural interests are basically all keyed to the acequia system that supports the land, water and inhabitants of Northern New Mexico in general, and the traditional Hispano and indigenous cultures in particular.

 

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Starting Conversations: History, Memory and Public Space Memory

History, Memory and Public Space is a series that addresses how differing historical perspectives shape our present and future. In this second installment of the series we introduce the subject of memory.

How does memory influence history? It is undeniable that individual and collective memories bring to bear layered, nuanced understandings of historical events that continue to shape our lives in the present in complex ways. In this conversation with Scott Hartwig and Heather McClenahan, we explore this broad question by thinking through historical monuments, their construction and reinforcement of history through memory.

Further reading: Creating Space for Conflicted Histories: https://raffiandonian.com/publications/

This series is facilitated by Raffi E. Andonian. Raffi is a best-selling author of 3 books. He has previously worked guiding visitors at the Gettysburg battlefield, the Civil War sites around Richmond, the Martin Luther King birth home in Atlanta, and the history museum in Los Alamos NM. He has a master’s degree in history and another master’s degree in historic preservation. 

D. Scott Hartwig retired in 2014 as the supervisory park historian at Gettysburg National Military Park after a 34-year career in the National Park Service, nearly all of it spent at Gettysburg. He won the regional Freeman Tilden Award for excellence in interpretation in 1993, and was a key player in the design of all aspects of the new Gettysburg museum/visitor center. He is the author of To Antietam Creek: The Maryland Campaign from September 3 to September 16, published in September 2012 by Johns Hopkins University Press, and is currently working on the second volume, tentatively titled, I Dread the Thought of Place: The Battle of Antietam, which covers the battle and end of the Maryland Campaign.

Heather McClenahan is a native New Mexican, born in Las Cruces, graduated from high school in Gallup, and spent the bulk of her career in Los Alamos. She has bachelor’s degrees in Journalism and Political Science from Drake University and a master’s in History from the University of South Florida. After retiring from the Executive Director position at the Los Alamos Historical Society in 2019, she and her husband were traveling the world, looking for warm places to live, and got stuck in Panama when the pandemic hit. They have since settled in Las Cruces, where Heather is working on a book about Los Alamos history in between hiking, bird watching, and eating green chile.

Live! Starting Conversations  Acequia Aqui: Water, Community and Creativity

15 Apr 2021

In partnership with The Paseo Project, the New Mexico Humanities Council is pleased to host a live Starting Conversations discussion in celebration of the publication of Acequia Aqui: Water, Community, and Creativity. For this conversation we will be joined by two contributing writers, Miguel Santistevan and Sylvia Rodriguez, who will address the urgent topics of acequias in New Mexico, their histories, and their futures.

The event will begin at 6pm MDT on April 15th. Register for the live Zoom event by clicking here. 

The history of acequias in New Mexico weaves a rich tapestry of multicultural practices that illustrate human migration, resilience, and connection to the land and water. The wisdom inherent in the historic acequias continue to tell these stories in the communities of New Mexico, but they have been at risk of disappearance in recent years as a result of climate change, increased real estate development, natural resource extraction and more. Acequia Aqui is an artistic and community driven project that aims to give voice to the historic acequias of Taos to illuminate the importance of this vital resource and cultural wellspring. 

Through this Starting Conversations series and special event, we hope to illuminate the artistic interventions that concentrate on themes of placemaking and keeping; storytelling and poetry; and technology and craft. These themes and the work of the individual artists give a framework to help us think through our cultural relationship to these life-giving waterways. 

Sylvia Rodriguez is professor emerita of anthropology and former director of the Ortiz Center for Intercultural Studies at UNM. Her research and publications have focused on interethnic relations in the Upper Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico, where over the past three decades she has studied the cultural impact on ethnic relation of tourism, ritual, ethnic identity, and conflict over land and water. She works collaboratively with acequia organizations and researchers on acequia matters and the politics and anthropology of water. She is a commissioner on the Acequia de San Antonio in Valdez and a member of the Taos Valley Acequia Association board of directors. Her publications include journal articles and two prize-winning books: The Matachines Dance: Ritual Symbolism and Interethnic Relations in the Upper Rio Grande Valley, and Acequia: Water Sharing, Sanctity, and Place.

Miguel Santistevan has Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Biology and Agriculture Ecology and certification in Permaculture and ZERI Design. He is an educator, seed saver, researcher of acequias and resilience, and radio producer of “¡Que Vivan las Acequias!” He writes semi-regularly for the Green Fire Times and has given dozens of professional presentations on acequia agriculture and the search for sustainability in a Climate Change context. Miguel founded the nonprofit organization Agriculture Implementation, Research, and Education (www.growfarmers.org), is a founding member of the NM Food and Seed Sovereignty Alliance, and has coordinated several youth-in-agriculture programs. He works as a Middle School Math teacher and lives in Taos on his acequia-irrigated farm with his wife and two daughters.

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Starting Conversations  Acequia Aqui: Storytelling and Poetry

Storytelling and Poetry is the second installment of our Starting Conversations: Acequia Aqui series. As part of our partnership with The Paseo Project (Taos, NM), this discussion series is celebrating Paseo Project’s recent publication: "Acequia Aqui: Water, Community and Creativity." This booklet highlights selections from the Acequia Aqui project that took place between 2018 and 2020. It’s an artistic and community driven project that aims to give voice to the historic acequias of Taos to illuminate the importance of this vital resource and cultural wellspring. You can view a digital version of this booklet on ISSU.

Our three guests, Elizabeth Hellstern, Rica Maestas, and Andrea Watson, have come together to talk about their individual work in Acequia Aqui and how their interventions made use of language, oral history traditions, and folklore to celebrate the acequias of Taos and ensure their preservation.

Elizabeth Hellstern is a writer and an artist working to make word interactive. Her artwork includes national placements of the public art installation the Telepoem Booth?, where members of the public can dial-a-poem on a phone in a vintage phone booth. She is the author of the experimental poetry flow-chart series, How to Live: A Suggestive Guide from Tolsun Books and the editor of and contributor to Telepoem Booth? Santa Fe: Collected Calls and Telepoem Booth?: Missed Calls and Other Poetry both from SkyHeart Editions. She received her MFA in Creative Writing from Northern Arizona University. Her multi-genre writing work has appeared in journals such as Hotel Amerika, American Journal of Poetry, Slag Glass City, The Tusculum Review, New World Writing and Cutthroat: A Journal of the Arts. Her creative projects have received funding from the Knight Foundation, New Mexico Humanities Council, Witter Bynner Foundation for Poetry, Iowa Humanities, and National Endowment for the Humanities. She lives in Cerrillos, NM and is currently working on a memoir.

Rica Maestas is a burqueña artist, arts worker, dog parent, and social practitioner. Inspired by the desert, loneliness, hybridity, and misunderstanding, her artistic practice invites participants into surreal and emotionally demanding spaces, be they real or imaginary. She graduated with a MA in public humanities from Brown University in 2018, attending with the generous support of the University of Southern California Renaissance Scholarship, awarded for interdisciplinary study. She has curated independent, experimental exhibitions as well as institutional projects, received numerous grants for her creative work, published written ruminations in diverse forums, and exhibited visual art and performance pieces nationwide.

Andrea L. Watson is founding publisher and editor of 3: A Taos Press, a multicultural and ethically voiced publishing house. Andrea’s poetry has appeared in Nimrod, Rhino, Subtropics, Cream City Review, Ekphrasis, International Poetry Review, and The Dublin Quarterly, among others. She has designed and curated eighteen ekphrasis events of poetry and art across the United States, commencing with Braided Lives: A Collaboration Between Artists and Poets, sponsored by the Taos Institute of Arts, which traveled to Denver, San Francisco, and Berkeley. She is co--editor of the poetry anthology, Collecting Life: Poets on Objects Known and Imagined and Malala: Poems for Malala Yousafzai, the proceeds of which were donated to The Malala Fund for Girls’ Education from FutureCycle Press.

Starting Conversations: Acequia Aqui Placemaking and Placekeeping

The history of acequias in New Mexico weaves a rich tapestry of multicultural practices that illustrate human migration, resilience, and connection to the land and water. The wisdom inherent in the historic acequias continue to tell these stories in the communities of New Mexico, but they have been at risk of disappearance in recent years as a result of climate change, increased real estate development, natural resource extraction and more. Acequia Aqui is an artistic and community driven project that aims to give voice to the historic acequias of Taos to illuminate the importance of this vital resource and cultural wellspring.

For the first discussion on Placemaking and Keeping, we’re joined by four of the project’s contributors: Ayrton Chapman, Fritz Hahn, Mark Henderson, and Ruben Olguin. Individually, each of their work intersects either directly with the acequias in Taos, or they have designed interventions and projects that call attention to lost waterways, land care and cultivation. This program series is co-presented with The Paseo Project in Taos. The Paseo Project’s mission is to transform art through community and community through art. In addition to collaborative community projects and a socially-engaged artist in residence program, The Paseo Project hosts the annual PASEO outdoor art festival in Historic Downtown Taos. Since 2014, artists from all over the world have brought projection, installation, and performance art to the streets of Taos for this free two-night event. Learn more at: https://www.paseoproject.org

George "Fritz" Hahn has been a Town Councilor since 2014 with an emphasis on acequia revitalization, noxious weed mitigation, recycling, landfill operations and sits on the hospital health study committee and nominating committee. Currently he serves as a board member of the Taos Valley Acequia Association.

Mark Henderson has volunteered doing archeology since 1965. From 1977 until 2007 he was an archeologist with the US Government in Taos, Socorro and Gallup NM, Window Rock, AZ and Ely, NV. Mark and his spouse, Yolanda Vigil returned to Taos in 2008 where Mark has used his handsome civil service pension to work as a volunteer in archeology, historic preservation, environmental research, acequia irrigation, and as a "docent" at SMU-in-Taos or under contract through Mark's enterprise, Chupadero Archeological Resources, LLC.

Ruben Olguin is a New Mexico based artist working in ceramics, adobe, sound, video, and electronic media. His work draws from his mixed Pueblo and Spanish heritage. He uses traditional/hand processes for sculpture and incorporates electronic elements. His practice “focuses spending as much time in the desert as in the computer lab”. His work has exhibited internationally, showing in Germany, Miami, Santa Fe and Taos. Olguin completed an MFA in studio arts from The University of New Mexico in 2015, and a BA in Cinematic Arts from The University of New Mexico in 2012. His goals are to make and teach new media art along with socially engaged art practices.

R. Ayrton Chapman was born and raised in Kilgore, TX. She completed her undergraduate degree in Photography at the University of North Texas and received her Masters in Experimental Art and Technology from UNM in 2017. During her time in grad school she joined Edible Carnival and has been touring & producing work individually & with the Carnival since. You can see more of her work here: AyrtonChapman.com EdibleCarnival.org ThinkyFlesh.com

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Starting Conversations: History, Memory, and Public Space

Image courtesy of the Los Alamos Historical Society Photo Archives

Image courtesy of the Los Alamos Historical Society Photo Archives

History, Memory, and Public Space explores the perspectives around how we utilize public space to engage with fraught histories.

In the first discussion, we integrate local and professional voices to help define the study of history - its purpose, significance, circulation, and regionalism. The creation of the atomic bomb in Los Alamos that continues to affect the entire world provides us a rich case study for helping understand the timeliness, relevance, and perspectives that shape the study of history. 

Links to some references made in the conversation:

The Emperor in August

The Emperor in August synopsis

Peace Garden at the Nimitz Museum of the Pacific War

This series is facilitated by Raffi Andonian who is a best-selling author of 3 books. He has previously worked guiding visitors at the Gettysburg battlefield, the Civil War sites around Richmond, the Martin Luther King birth home in Atlanta, and the history museum in Los Alamos NM. He has a master’s degree in history and another master’s degree in historic preservation.

Raffi will be joined by guests Christian E. Fearer and John Bartlit. 

Christian E. Fearer is a senior historian for the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Prior to his current appointment, he served as a senior historian at U.S. Special Operations Command, deploying to Afghanistan on three occasions to serve on the headquarters staffs of elite special operations forces. He previously worked for the National Park Service at historic sites in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Alaska. He is a distinguished graduate of the U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, and studied history at West Virginia University. He lives in Northern Virginia. The thoughts, views, and opinions expressed by Mr. Fearer are entirely his own and do not represent those of the Department of Defense.

John Bartlit, PhD, had a distinguished 31-year career at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a research chemical engineer. His professional work applied methods in his field: from process design and unit operations; to the control of integrated systems; and extending to safety concerns and economics. Dr. Bartlit has had a concurrent career as a volunteer since the formative years of the environmental movement, from which he writes a monthly newspaper column on broad aspects of the environment and the role of the public forum. 

At LANL, Bartlit was a co-leader of a facility for developing and testing integrated systems for reprocessing tritium, a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. The project was jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and staffed by scientists and engineers from LANL and from Japan. 

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Starting Conversations: Blackdom, NM

Dr. Timothy E. Nelson

Dr. Timothy E. Nelson

Geni Flores

Geni Flores

Janice Dunnahoo

Janice Dunnahoo

Maya L. Allen

Maya L. Allen

Blackdom, New Mexico, founded in 1903 by Francis Boyer and twelve other enterprising African Americans, is one of the state’s most important, yet often most overlooked town. Despite its importance and relevance, the history of this township has been obscured from mainstream history for several decades. We will hear from an interdisciplinary panel of speakers who each have unique insights on the cultural and historical significance of the Blackdom township with a live Q&A from the audience to follow. 

Our panelists for this program are: 

Dr. Timothy E. Nelson is a Historian, Professor, Philosopher whose multi-faceted work concerns racism, ambition, and the search for opportunity. These themes were revealed in his 2015 Ph.D. dissertation The Significance of the Afro-Frontier. Dr. Nelson was born in South Central LA, raised in Compton, during the early 1990s in the wake of race and class-based conflict with the LAPD. He earned his Ph.D. from (UTEP) the University of Texas at El Paso. Visit: blackdomthesis.com

Geni Flores is the coordinator of bilingual and TESOL education at Eastern New Mexico University.  She is a former instructor of Multicultural Education including “the Multicultural Heritage of the Southwest.”  She has studied Blackdom at length and has presented over this topic at the university and public school levels.

Janice Dunnahoo is an Archivist for the Historical Society of Southeastern New Mexico; Public Historical Speaker for local Government and Civic Organizations; Contributing author for publications such as West Texas Historical Association Newsletter, Wild West Journal, True West magazine, Texas-New Mexico Border Archives Journal, Roswell Daily Record newspaper; Weekly Historical Columnist for Roswell Daily Record newspaper, (Roswell, New Mexico) under the heading of “Historically Speaking”; Contributing author for a book titled “Notable Black Women in Texas History,” which is in progress; and a panelist for the Western History Association Conference 2020.

Maya L. Allen is a PhD student in Biology at the University of New Mexico who focuses on how plants cope with environmental heterogeneity and a particular underlying mechanism, phenotypic plasticity - the ability for a single genotype to differentially express alternative phenotypes based on the environment. In returning to her home state of New Mexico, Ms. Allen has also researched the history of Blackdom, the first all-Black settlement in the state, in an effort to rectify the erasure of the Black botanical contributions and highlight the Black botanical experience.

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Starting Conversations: Diversity in News & Media Coverage

In the third installment of our Starting Conversations series on Journalism and Democracy, our facilitator Megan Kamerick invites journalists and broadcasters from New Mexico and the broader Southwest to discuss the role diversity plays in journalistic coverage. Guest speakers include Sunnie Rae Clahchischiligi (independent journalist, instructor, and scholar), Russell Contreras (Axios), Shaun Griswold (New Mexico In Depth), Nash Jones (Morning Edition KUNM host), and Monica Ortiz Uribe (El Paso Times) who each describe their personal experiences working for media outlets and expanding the identities of the voices behind the stories and broadcasts.

Below is a list of resources and further reading on the subject of diversity in the news:

A historic year, learning loss threatens recent educational gains (NM In Depth)

COVID disparities force a public health reckoning (NM In Depth)

Native American Journalists Association Scholarship Application (NAJA Newsroom)

Tribal Nations Media Guide (NAJA Newsroom)

Native American Journalists Association 2020 Media Spotlight Report (NAJA Newsroom)

New On-Air Source Diversity Data for NPR Show Much Work Ahead

Race and the newsroom: 7 studies to know

Newsroom employees are less diverse than U.S. workers overall

AMERICAN DIARY: July 4 hurts, until I remember my WWII uncle

The Navajo Nation and Coronavirus: Planting Hope Amid a Plague

Confronting racism within the press

How Trans Journalists are Challenging--and Changing--Journalism

This program is made possible by the Mellon Foundation through their initiative Democracy and the Informed Citizen.

The New Mexico Humanities Councils is a non-profit dedicated to exploring who we are, who we were and who we wish to be.

Starting Conversations: Challenges Facing Local News

This Starting Conversations session is the second installment of our series on Journalism and Democracy, facilitated by Megan Kamerick of NMPBS. In this episode the topic is "Challenges Facing Local News" and Kamerick and her guests discuss the changing landscape of local news rooms in New Mexico. Kamerick is joined by Julie Ann Grimm (Santa Fe Reporter), Julia Dendinger (Valencia County Bulletin), Algernon D'Ammassa (Las Cruces Sun News), Rashad Mahmood (New Mexico Local News Fund), and Alicia Zuckerman (WLRN Miami) all of whom offer insights into the challenges facing local news publications and broadcasting stations in the age of information.

This program is made possible by the Mellon Foundation initiative Democracy and the Informed Citizen.

Below is a resource list with more information: 

The Death and Life of Great American Newspapers

Now We Need To Rebuild Local Newsrooms

U.S. Newsrooms have shed half their employees since 2008

The most feared owner in American journalism looks set to take some of its greatest assets

Starving the Watchdogs

The coronavirus has closed more than 60 local newsrooms across America. And counting.

As election looms, a network of mysterious ‘pink slime’ local news outlets nearly triples in size

As Local News Dies, a Pay-for-Play Network Rises in Its Place

News deserts and ghost newspapers: Will local news survive?

Interactive map of news deserts

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Starting Conversations with Megan Kamerick: Media Literacy and Disinformation

Starting Conversations is now kicking off a limited series of programs on the topic of journalism and democracy facilitated by Megan Kamerick, of NMPBS. In this first episode, “Media Literacy and Disinformation,” Kamerick is joined by Jonathan Anzalone, Monica Braine, Marisa Demarco, Jessica Onsurez, and Pamela Pereyra to discuss the many ways disinformation is spread and how we can all become better news consumers.

This program is made possible by the Mellon Foundation initiative Democracy and the Informed Citizen.

 Below is a resource list with information on news literacy:

Center for News Literacy

Center For News Literacy digital resources

Media Savvy Citizens

Media Savvy Citizens YouTube Channel

Study - Is there a Fake News Generation?

Death of local news 

Is Fake News Another Name For Propaganda 

A Partisan Future For Local News? 

Resource page for identifying fake news 

No More Normal: The Disinformation Age 

How to do a reverse image search

Breaking News Consumer's Handbook: Fake News Edition 

Civic Online Reasoning

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Tribute to Rudolfo Anaya

1 Jul 2020

NMHC honors the memory and achievements of Rudolfo Anaya, one of the founders and leading lights of the Chicano literary movement and native New Mexican writer and activist. Featuring State Historian Robert Martinez with special guests Enrique LaMadrid, Patricia Perea, Michael Trujillo, Denise Chavez, Michelle Otero, Levi Romero, Melina Vizcaino-Aleman, and Cecelia Aragon as well as many others. 

For a special dedicatory poem by Nasario Garcia: https://nmhumanities.org/NMHC.php?p=234

 

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MUNDOS DE MESTIZAJE with Valerie Martinez

8 Jul 2020

Join Valerie Martinez, Program Director for History & Literary Arts at the National Hispanic Cultural Center for "Mundos de Metizaje", the legendary mural on the grounds of NHCC. “Mundos de Mestizaje,” by New Mexico master artist Frederico Vigil, is a buon fresco that depicts thousands of years of Hispanic identity and history in the broadest sense, from Europe to Mesoamerica and into the U.S. Southwest. At 4000 square feet, it is the largest concave fresco in the United States.  The monumental fresco is located in the Torreón on the campus of the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA.

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This program is made possible through the generous support of the McCune Foundation.

 

 

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The State of the Humanities in New Mexico

15 Jul 2020

Join NMHC Executive Director Brandon Johnson in conversation with Interim Program Manager Kenn Watt for a wide-ranging conversation about the work of the Humanities Council and the necessity and relevance of the humanities generally for New Mexicans today

 

 

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Run: The Super Athletes of the Sierra Madre with Diana Molina

22 Jul 2020

Raramuri, Uto-Aztecan for Tarahumara, are among the world's best runners from lives spent traversing the canyon walls and plateaus of the Sierra Madre Occidental in northern Mexico.  In a personal narrative complimented by anthropological, ethnographic and scientific research, Diana Molina will feature the exceptional Raramuri culture, discuss the impact of modern society on their lifestyle and highlight the amazing expanse of the canyon environment with stunning photographs taken while living among the tribe for extended periods of time.

 

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Boots, Suits and Citizens: New Mexico’s Unique Legislative Culture with Dede Feldman

29 Jul 2020

New Mexico’s citizens’ legislature is a reflection of the state’s history—the divide between the rural and urban lifestyles, the unique mix of ethnic groups, and the personal and familial connections at the heart of a small state. Spanish might be spoken in the hallways of the Roundhouse as much as English, and  Native American issues are often pivotal.

Former Senator Dede Feldman’s talk illustrates this culture with tales of heroes, villains, unlikely alliances, special interests, and successful advocates! 

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Elizabeth Jacobson and Axle Contemporary

5 Aug 2020

On August 5th, join Axle Contemporary and Santa Fe Poet Laureate Elizabeth Jacobson as we discuss teaching art and poetry as social action. They will talk about their civic project, a poetry and visual arts venture for high school teenagers encompassing the study and crafting of poems, graphic design and silk screening of poetry on t-shirts, portrait photography, readings, and publication of an anthology. The project will culminate in an exhibition of framed poems and portrait photographs of the teens wearing their poetry t-shirts at the Santa Fe Community Gallery in spring 2021.

Elizabeth Jacobson is the Poet Laureate of Santa Fe, New Mexico and an Academy of American Poets 2020 Poet Laureate Fellow.  Her most recent book, Not into the Blossoms and Not into the Air, won the New Measure Poetry Prize, selected by Marianne Boruch (Free Verse Editions/Parlor Press, 2019), and the 2019 New Mexico-Arizona Book Award for both New Mexico Poetry and Best New Mexico Book. She is the founding director of the WingSpan Poetry Project, a not-for-profit which from 2013-2020 conducted weekly poetry classes in battered family and homeless shelters in New Mexico. WingSpan has received four grants from the Witter Bynner Foundation for Poetry. Elizabeth is the Reviews Editor for the on-line literary journal Terrain.org and she teaches poetry workshops regularly in the Santa Fe community.

 

 

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Women's Suffrage Centennial - the New Mexico Perspective

Join us for a rousing discussion of this landmark year - the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage in the United States - with a distinctly New Mexican spin. Our distinguished guests will be retired surgeon, writer and activist Sylvia Ramos Cruz, Dr. Meredith Machen, past president of the League of Women Voters of New Mexico (https://www.lwvnm.org/), historian and writer Georgellen Burnett (author of We Just Toughed it Out: Women in the Llano Estacado), and Marguerite Kearns, writer, activist, and creator of the Suffrage Wagon News Channel (suffragewagon.org).

Check our Youtube channel Wednesday at 5pm on August 12th to tune in; no registration needed!

This program is made possible through the generous support of the Mellon Foundation's Democracy and the Informed Citizen initiative.

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Jews and Navajos: Worlds of Tradition and Sacred Lands with Gordon Bronitsky

Jews and Navajos -- and Native Americans more generally -- share much in common: living in the world of tradition and the world of the present, 1492, ties to sacred lands, and more. Gordon Bronitsky explores some of the commonalities and how these communities have worked together in the past, as well as possible directions for the future.

Gordon Bronitsky an anthropologist by training (PhD University of Arizona 1977).  For the last 23 years, he has been founder/president of Bronitsky and Associates dba IndigeNOW!. IndigeNOW's mission is simple – to work with Indigenous artists and performers, traditional and contemporary, to bring their voices and messages to the world.  And he has worked on every continent except Antarctica.  He has also facilitated numerous Jewish/American Indian dialogs and programs.

This program is made possible through the generous support of the McCune Foundation. Please take a moment to fill out this evaluation and let us know how we did

 

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Humanities NOW: According to Hakim Bellamy!  

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26 Aug 2020

On August 26th, Starting Conversations welcomes poet and Deputy Director of the Cultural Services Department Hakim Bellamy for a uniquely personal look at life, art, and politics in today's Albuquerque. Join us on our Youtube channel.

 

Before being tapped by Mayor Keller to serve as the Deputy Director of the Cultural Services Department, Hakim Bellamy was the Inaugural Poet Laureate for the City of Albuquerque (2012-2014). Bellamy is a W. K. Kellogg Foundation Community Leadership Network Fellow, a Kennedy Center Citizen Artist Fellow, an Academy for the Love of Learning Leonard Bernstein Fellow, Western States Arts Alliance Launchpad Fellow, Santa Fe Arts Institute Food Justice Fellow, New Mexico Strategic Leadership Institute alum and soon to be Citizen University Civic Seminary Fellow (August  2020). In 2012 he published his first collection of poetry, SWEAR (West End Press/University of New Mexico Press), and it landed him the Working Class Studies Tillie Olsen Award for Literature in 2012. With an M.A. in Communications from the University of New Mexico (UNM), Bellamy has held adjunct faculty positions at UNM and the Institute of American Indian Arts. Bellamy has shared his work, in person, in at least five countries and continues to use his art to change his communities. His latest book is We Are Neighbors (2019), a collaboration with photographer Justin Thor Simenson. www.beyondpoetryink.com 

This program is made possible through the generous support of the McCune Foundation.

 

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Sept. 2: Nikki Nojima Louis, Artistic Director, JACL Players - New Mexico Japanese-American Citizens League

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Join Dr. Louis for some Japanese-American WW II internment history, personal narrative, tanka poetry, and the work of the JACL Players!

Nikki Nojima Louis's connection to New Mexico began during WWII when she would sit on the steps of her prison barracks in Minidoka, Idaho, opening packages marked "enemy alien mail" from her father's DOJ prison camp in Santa Fe.  They contained Pueblo pottery, and beaded jewelry, and brightly colored wooden toys -- and she thought New Mexico was a magical place. She still does, more than 75 years later, because of the magic and mystery of the stories she continues to discover here.


The full circle of her journey to New Mexico began as a child in Seattle of Japanese immigrant parents; removal of her father by the FBI on her fourth birthday, December 7, 1941; and incarceration in a desert camp in Idaho with her mother and 10,000 others of Japanese ancestry.  In 2002, Louis entered graduate school at age 65. In 2007, she arrived in New Mexico--a newly minted Ph.D.--for a fellowship at the Santa Fe Art Institute.  The journey of discovery of the prison camps of New Mexico had just begun.


Louis is artistic director of JACL Players, the readers theater group of New Mexico's Japanese American Citizens League. Thanks to NMHC, JACL Players have brought "Living History" performances to New Mexico audiences since 2014.  Louis will start our conversation with a demonstration of the opening of a "Living History" presentation.


This presentation is made possible through the generous support of the McCune Foundation.

 

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Laura Paskus - "At the Precipice: New Mexico's Changing Climate" - Part Two - September 17th at 6pm  

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Starting Conversations again hosts NMPBS environmental reporter Laura Paskus in celebration of her new book, At the Precipice: New Mexico's Changing Climate, just published by UNM Press. Laura's guest panelists will be New Mexico Congresswoman Deb Haaland and Theresa Pasqual of the Pueblo of Acoma and the Department of Interior’s Office of Water and Science.

 

Theresa Pasqual is member of the Pueblo of Acoma and served as the Pueblo’s first female Historic Preservation Director.  During her tenure, Ms. Pasqual was responsible for protecting the cultural, archaeological, and historical resources of the Pueblo within its current boundary and ancestral lands within the greater Southwest. 

Ms. Pasqual led a multi-Tribal nomination of 400,000 square acres of Mount Taylor as a Traditional Cultural Property to the NM Register of Historic Places.  Its listing upheld by the NM Supreme Court remains today an example of community empowerment, strategic coalition building, and elevating voice that has become a template for other such designations.

Her current work for the Department of Interior’s Office of Water and Science, continues her passion in historic preservation, conservation, stewardship and systems change. Ms. Pasqual is a Kellogg Foundation Leadership Fellow and a recipient of the NM Heritage Award for her work with Tribes.  She is an active board member for Conservation Voters New Mexico-Education Fund, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  

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Laura Paskus, part 1 - “At the Precipice: New Mexico’s Changing Climate” - the Science

Starting Conversations features  NMPBS environmental reporter Laura Paskus for two conversations on the fate of the Rio Grande River and the environment in New Mexico. Paskus’ new book At the Precipice: New Mexico’s Changing Climate is being published by UNM Press on September 15th and is available for preorder on Amazon and through UNM Press. 

Laura Paskus has been a journalist since 2002, when she began her career at High Country News. She’s also worked as managing editor for Tribal College Journal, a publication of the American Indian Higher Education Consortium. She has freelanced for publications including Al Jazeera, Ms. Magazine, Indian Country Today, National Geographic Online, Columbia Journalism Review, The Progressive, Santa Fe Reporter, Audubon Magazine, World Wildlife Magazine, The Nature Conservancy Magazine, New Mexico Magazine, New Mexico In Depth, and Orion.  She has worked as a reporter and producer for KUNM-FM in Albuquerque, as the environment reporter for New Mexico Political Report, and is currently a correspondent and producer for New Mexico PBS, for the monthly series, “Our Land: New Mexico’s Environmental Past, Present and Future.” This year, she’s working in collaboration with FRONTLINE on a year-long investigation into the military’s contamination of groundwater in New Mexico. Paskus was a 2019 Leopold Writing Program Resident and her book “At the Precipice: New Mexico’s Changing Climate,” is forthcoming in September 2020 from the University of New Mexico Press. She’s also a board member of the Society of Environmental Journalists.

On September 3rd, at 6pm, Laura is joined by  UNM Economics Professor John Fleck.  A former science journalist, John Fleck is focused on the problems of the Colorado River, an imperiled water source on which 40 million people in the United States and Mexico depend. As a Professor of Practice in Water Policy and Governance in the University of New Mexico Department of Economics and director of the University’s Water Resources Program, he co-teaches classes in contemporary water policy issues, modeling, and technical communication for water managers. He first wrote about water in the 1980s as a beat reporter covering the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. He is the author of the books Water is for Fighting Over and Other Myths About Water in the West, an exploration of solutions to the Colorado River Basin’s water problems, and co-author of Science Be Dammed: How Ignoring Inconvenient Science Drained the Colorado River.

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The French in New Mexico with François-Marie Patorni

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On September 23rd join us on Starting Conversations for this fascinating talk about a lesser-known aspect of our state's history. The history of the French, French Canadians, and other French-speaking people in New Mexico covers the last 400 years and all areas of New Mexico. In this illustrated talk and discussion, we will remember the lives of a few of the most influential, unusual, or colorful individuals, through stories of love and death, of chases and hunts, and of successes and failures. Thousands of New Mexicans have French ancestors. A few descendants will participate and share their family lore with the audience.  This talk is offered as a contribution to their cultural resurrection. More information is in the book "The French in New Mexico - Four Centuries of Exploration, Adventure, and Influence,” www.FrenchInNewMexico.com

François-Marie Patorni, a French American, is an independent scholar specializing in the history of the French-speaking people in New Mexico and the American Southwest. His book, "The French in New Mexico - Four Centuries of Exploration, Adventure, and Influence,” was published in April 2020.

Patorni was born and grew-up in Paris. After post-graduate studies in France, he spent two years as a volunteer in Chad, and some more time in Togo, Benin, and Algeria. Later, he tried the American experience, earning an MBA from the Wharton School in Philadelphia in 1972. On campus, he got involved in the Nixon-McGovern Presidential campaign, quite a ride for a Frenchman!  He then had a career at the World Bank in Washington D.C., including multi-years postings in India and Senegal, and frequent travel to Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and Asia.

Patorni moved to New Mexico in 2004. He realized the extraordinarily rich history of the French, French Canadians, and other French-speaking people, and embarked on his great chase for the French in New Mexico. He also was been an environmental advocate in New Mexico, including being president of the Santa Fe Watershed Association for 7 years.

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September 30th - New Mexico Humanities Council CARES Act recipients!

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Join Starting Conversations for a look at some of our grantees and the amazing cultural work being done throughout the state. Mr. Bart Wilsey, Director, Farmington Museum Foundation, Mr. Salvador Ruiz, Executive Director, Moving Arts Española, Mr. Jeff Benham,Treasurer, Sol Arts dba 7000 BC, and Ms. Teresa Dahl-Bredine; Artistic Director of Virus Theatre

Jeff Benham is Education Coordinator for northern New Mexico-based arts non-profit 7000 BC.  He has spent more than thirty five years tellingstories through word and image, utilizing a broad range of media andstyle, most prominently comic books and live theatre.  Throughout his career, he's brought this expertise to arts education at a diverse range of public and private institutions including Albuquerque Academy, Harwood Art Center, Santa Fe University of Art and Design, UNM Honors College, Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine, Bradbury Science, and the Veterans Administration.  He's particularly interested in bridging between the arts and other disciplines.  Currently, Jeff is completing Volume 2 of Peoplings, a graphic novel about autism and the roots of special education.

For information about Moving Arts Española:

Moving Arts

The Virus Theater Ensemble is a dynamic troupe of actors, writers, designers, and directors who collaborate to create imaginative and highly physical devised theater. Our work is rooted in rural southwest New Mexico and takes flight into universal human experiences. In 23 years, we have produced 28 plays – including 20 devised originals, along with several plays featuring area youth. Our live theater season and first regional tour were postponed in 2020 due to pandemic restrictions. Virus Theater has launched a Patreon page during the pandemic, offering our local and virtual community new video and audio theatrical pieces along with filmed portions of past live theater performances.

Teresa Dahl-Bredine, Founder & Artistic Director (BA Theater Studies, Yale University, 1997) returned to her hometown of Silver City, NM, compelled to engage local voices and audiences and founded Virus Theater (VT). Her love of physical theater and intimate connection to community drives the company’s creative direction, vision, and storytelling. Teresa has directed 25 plays and 2 films with VT.  She is dedicated to growing her knowledge base through intense self-study and study with a variety of schools and teachers, including SITI and Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre.

 

Bart Wilsey has been with the Farmington Museum for a combined twenty-two years; the first eight as Curator then fourteen years as Director.  His background includes an eclectic array of positions including being a Museum Director, Curator of Exhibits, Graphic Designer, Interactive Media Designer, and Photographer.  He holds a BFA in fine arts from the University of South Dakota and an MA in Museum Studies from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln.  During his tenure he has expanded the Farmington Museum’s main facility by 10,000sq./ft., added an additional museum in downtown Farmington (The Museum of Navajo Art & Culture,) and recently received a donation of over 400 Navajo Weavings.  He has also been an AAM Museum Assessment Program (MAP) reviewer for the past five years.  On a personal note, he is a Navajo textile aficionado and is starting a vineyard and (someday) winery.  He has a beautiful wife Ingrid and two wonderful, inquisitive, and very active kids: Emma Pearl (8yrs) and Cy (15yrs).       

October 1 - Starting Conversations - Juan de Oñate and Public Art

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Starting Conversations takes a look at  some of the issues and controversies generated by the statue of Spanish Governor Juan de Oñate and its reception in downtown Albuquerque over the years. We will be joined by New York Times National Correspondent Simon Romero, University of New Mexico School of Architecture and Planning Associate Professor Moises Gonzalez, and Aleta "Tweety" Paisano-Suazo, of the Pueblos of Acoma and Laguna, activist and educator.

This program is funded by the generous support of the Mellon Foundation initiative Democracy and the Informed Citizen.

Simon Romero is a National Correspondent for The New York Times, based in Albuquerque and covering the Southwest. He joined The Times in 1999 and has held positions including Brazil Bureau Chief, Andes Bureau Chief and global energy correspondent, based in Houston. He was born and raised in northern New Mexico, and graduated with honors from Harvard College. 

Moises Gonzales is an Associate Professor of Urban Design in Community and Regional Planning at the School of Architecture and Planning at the University of New Mexico. He is a genízaro heir of both the Cañón de Carnué Land Grant and the San Antonio de Las Huertas land grant. He currently serves on the Board of Trustees of the Carnué Land Grant and has written various academic articles on the history and culture of genízaro settlements of New Mexico. He is a danzante of the Matachin and Comanche traditions of the Sandia mountain communities. With Dr. Enrique LaMadrid, Moises is co-editor of the book, Genízaro Nation: Ethnogenesis, Place, and Identity in New Mexico by UNM press (2019).

Tweety Paisano-Suazo, is from the Pueblos of Acoma (mother) and Laguna (father) and comes from the Eagle (mother) and Lizard (father) Clans. Tweety has been an advocate for Pueblo Rights since her fight against the “Onate Statue” at Tigua Park (1999) (which was designated by the City of Albuquerque in remembrance of the Tigua Pueblo Indians which were in the Albuquerque area). Tweety is currently the Chair of the Native American Democratic Caucus of New Mexico.  She was a DPNM Delegate to the 2020 DNC Convention and she will be one of five Delegates to place the NM Vote at the Electoral College.   

Rachael Lorenzo (Mescalero Apache, Laguna Pueblo, Xicana) is a community organizer, reproductive justice advocate, and wannabe IT pro. As a queer parent of two Indigenous children, Rachael envisions a world where rest is prioritized and we redistribute our resources to invest in what people need and love.

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October 7th - Albuquerque Poet Laureate Mary Oishi

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Join us on the 7th for a lively, candid conversation about life, art, and social justice with Albuquerque's new Poet Laureate Mary Oishi. 

Mary Oishi was named Albuquerque Poet Laureate on July 1, 2020. A familiar figure in New Mexico’s thriving poetry scene, Oishi is the author of Spirit Birds They Told Me (West End Press, 2011), and co-author with her daughter, Aja Oishi, of Rock Paper Scissors (Swimming with Elephants Publications, 2018), finalist for the New Mexico Arizona Book Award. She is one of twelve U.S. poets in translation in 12 Poetas: Antologia De Nuevos Poetas Estadounidenses (La Herrata Feliz and MarEsCierto, 2017), a project of the Mexican Ministry of Culture. Her poems have appeared in Mas Tequila Review, Malpais Review, Harwood Anthology, and numerous other print and digital publications.

Oishi worked professionally and as an on-air personality in public radio for 25 years, hosting blues shows at four radio stations in New Mexico and Colorado. She retired as KUNM’s Development Director in early 2019, but continues to host Wang Dang Doodle, a weekly blues music show, on KSFR-FM Santa Fe.

Her involvement in the work of community and social justice is life-long. She served as lead facilitator for an LGBTQ youth group for seventeen years, produced Peace Buzz, an event of art-as-protest in 2003, and was an NGO delegate to the UN World Conference Against Racism in 2001.
 
This program is supported by the generosity of the McCune Foundation.
 
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October 22nd at 6pm - Laura Paskus' At the Precipice, part 3

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Join Starting Conversations with guest host, NMPBS environmental reporter Laura Paskus for our third and final conversation in celebration of the publication of her book At the Precipice: New Mexico's Changing Climate. Laura's guest will be Erik Schlenker-Goodrich, Executive Director of the Western Environmental Law Center.

This program is made possible by the generous support of the Mellon Foundation initiative Democracy, Journalism and the Informed Citizen.

Erik Schlenker-Goodrich is the executive director of the Western Environmental Law Center and a resident of Taos, New Mexico. Erik leads WELC’s campaigns to phase out fossil fuels and build climate resilience, including work now underway in New Mexico to prevent oil and gas climate pollution, protect iconic watersheds and public lands, and support a just and equitable transition towards a clean, renewable energy economy. Erik is a graduate of Cornell University with a B.S. in natural resources, and earned his law degree and a certificate in environmental & natural resources law from the University of Oregon School of Law.

The program is in two parts due to a technical malfunction. For the second part:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Wi3ORBAXrI

Thank you to the Mellon Foundation for their generous support of this program!

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